Wednesday, June 2, 2010

Thank You?

More of a rant than anything.

I once teamed up with a co-worker to collect all the crazy-long email signatures people use. I think the longest we ever collected was around 10 lines, complete with pictures (a logo) and an alphabet soup of titles earned. Email address was included...which I still have a hard time figuring out why. Perhaps someone will print it? I guess those people still exist.

Anyway, the other day I noticed this (not the first time, just the first time I thought to write about, I have nothing else useful to say so maybe this will clear the bit of block I am having right now).
Thank You,

First Name Last Name
Phone Number(s)
Thank You? Is that just to save time and keystrokes as Sten Vesterli [twitter|blog] notes:

Sten Vesterli

I understand the efficiency part...but what if there is no actual "Thanks" required? Just seems a bit...weird to me.

I will end my email communiques with one of the following:
* Thanks
* Regards (probably a UK influence there)
* Sincerely

With my name, "chet" following a couple of lines below.

It's not that much extra typing, for me. I'm in the 70 WPM range...and maybe that's where the difference is. Who knows?

Just needed to get this off the chest.


The Mop said...

Or he wants to remind himself to thank all the people he collaborates with from day to day.

Life is a team sport.

oraclenerd said...

I just don't like the "fakeness" of it. I can tell, in most cases, when it is your signature. You couldn't spend an extra 6 (for "thanks" keystrokes for me?

Anonymous said...

In business correspondence with parties outside the company, it is good form to include your email address because when it gets forwarded that meta information can easily be lost.

oraclenerd said...

good point @anonymous

Tom said...


Tim... said...

What about "Cheers"?



PS. Typed, not faked. :)

oraclenerd said...

"Cheers" will work too. I use that only when communicating with the UK folks like the Oracle Person of the Year, Christian and Robin. :)

Dan Norris said...

10 lines is nothing. Robert Freeman had the longest sig I've ever seen. It's archived on Oracle-L forever (several times--often longer than the reply he wrote). See a sample at,2

oraclenerd said...

I think Mr. Freeman now holds the title.

Robert G. Freeman
Oracle ACE
Oracle Database 11g RMAN Backup and Recovery (Oracle Press) - ON IT'S WAY SOON!
OCP: Oracle Database 11g Administrator Certified Professional Study Guide
Oracle Database 11g New Features (Oracle Press)
Portable DBA: Oracle (Oracle Press)
Oracle Database 10g New Features (Oracle Press)
Oracle9i RMAN Backup and Recovery (Oracle Press)
Oracle9i New Features (Oracle Press)
Other various titles out of print now...
The LDS Church is looking for DBA's. You do have to be a Church member in
good standing. A lot of kind people write me, concerned I may be breaking
the law by saying you have to be a Church member. It's legal I promise! :-)

I've seen it before on oracle-l...just never crossed my mind that it could possibly contend for a world title. Thank you Mr. Norris.

Tom said...

I think Robert is writing more books! Watch out

oraclenerd said...


He might be responsible for bringing the internet down due to the size of his signature alone!

Tom said...

Better not pull his sig up on the new AT&T plan. The sig alone will eat your 2GB of bandwidth :)


Robert Freeman said...

I SURRENDER!! I will make it a point to reduce my sig!

I KNEW Dan was mad at me about SOMETHING. Now I know what it was!


oraclenerd said...

Mr. Freeman,

You've gone above and beyond the call of I think you deserve a pass.

Dan's a pussycat anyway.

(don't tell anyone...but that "Tom" character, well, you should get him back somehow)

Robert Freeman said...

Revenge is best served cold... I shall wait for a moment when he least expects it... moooohahahahaha

Joel Garry said...

On usenet, sometimes people would top-post, which would wind up including the previous post as part of their .sig... At one time, there was some rule about only 4 80 character lines.

This is pretty funny (and old): as is /.

Of course, some googling finds other examples, including lawyers arguing about it. Not to mention the grandaddy.